The Ten Critical Steps of Taking a Triage Call



By Marci Lawing

The goal of every triage call is to make patients feel comfortable and heard, while at the same time collect critical information from them and get them to the appropriate level of care based on their symptoms.

Step 1: Introduce Yourself. Use your first name, title, and the practice or physician you represent. It’s imperative for you to clearly identify yourself and state your credentials as a nurse employee of the practice for which you work. When you introduce yourself, you create a relationship.

Step 2: Collect Demographic Information. Before you are ready to hear your patient’s concerns, you will need to know some basic information. Age, gender, and other data will affect your triage protocols, so be sure to collect all the necessary demographic information. This information is needed so it can be put in the appropriate chart and followed up.

Step 3: Gather Medical History. Get a brief medical history so you do not miss any important surgeries, medications, or relevant medical information from the recent months or years. You’ll want to know your patient’s medical history before he or she details the current issue.

Step 4: Let the Patient Talk. Now that you’ve armed yourself with all the necessary information you need to proceed, let the patient speak freely about current concerns. Be an active listener. That means that you don’t just listen; you participate in the conversation by asking any probing questions needed to ascertain a full description of the patient’s complaint.

Step 5: Document the Assessment. Once you’ve listened carefully to the patient, document your assessment carefully with the necessary details.

Step 6: Choose the Right Protocol. With the right triage protocol, this step can be fast and efficient. Be sure to document the answer to each question and make any additional notes needed.

Step 7: Get the Patient to the Right Level of Care. Now that you’ve followed the protocols and completed the assessment, you’re ready to recommend the level of care your patient needs. Be sure to speak clearly and at a pace the patient can follow while you detail every step he or she needs to take.

Step 8: Give Relevant Care Advice. Provide solutions based on the patient’s symptoms in order to help identify the best path to care.

Step 9: Make Sure Your Patient Knows When to Call Back. Confirm that the patient fully understands your triage advice and knows when and who to follow up with.

Step 10: Offer Reassurance. Make sure your patient is able and willing to follow the plan you discussed. It is important, especially with serious symptoms, that the patient follows your triage advice. If told to go to the ER, verify with the patient that he or she has access to safe transportation.

You can’t underestimate the power of empathy. Over 80 percent of patients who call their physician’s office may not need urgent care, but they all urgently need empathy, someone to listen, and someone to care. That’s the role of the triage nurse. In addition to being a good clinician, a critical thinker, and making sure everyone stays safe, you are also there to provide empathy and care advice to patients.

These ten critical steps will help you stay on track and ensure that patients get the quality care they deserve.

Marci Lawing, RN BSN, is the clinical nurse manager at TriageLogic LLC. TriageLogic’s online learning center is available free of charge to telephone triage nurses and teams as an educational resource and practical training guide. Along with course videos, coursework includes class notes, related articles, and learning materials. You will receive a TriageLogic Telephone Nurse Triage Certification for each completed course. Managers can also set up teams and check their individual nurses’ progress in the course.

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About Peter DeHaan

Wordsmith Peter DeHaan shares his passion for life and faith through words. Peter DeHaan’s website (http://peterdehaan.com) contains information and links to his blogs, newsletter, and social media pages. Peter DeHaan is the president of Peter DeHaan Publishing, Inc., (http://peterdehaanpublishing.com) the publisher and editor of Connections Magazine and AnswerStat, and editor of Article Weekly.